Venice 2021- “The Card Counter” is a Cinematic Dead Man’s Hand : Film Review

After the acclaim of director Paul Schrader’s last feature, First Reformed, many likely would bet that his next film would be a success, especially with Oscar Isaac as its leading man. Those individuals would have lost out on a lot of cash as The Card Counter is the first major flop at the Venice FilmContinue reading “Venice 2021- “The Card Counter” is a Cinematic Dead Man’s Hand : Film Review”

Venice 2021- “Trenches (Tranchees)” is an Unflinching Look at the Ukrainian Front Line: Film Review

The flickering of a nearly burnt out light bulb. The “Fatality!” sound effect from playing Mortal Kombat on a dusty Nintendo Switch. The soft glow of an old smartphone. Besides these few modern images, Trenches could have been depicting the life of a soldier during World War 1. The haunting black and white visuals ofContinue reading “Venice 2021- “Trenches (Tranchees)” is an Unflinching Look at the Ukrainian Front Line: Film Review”

Venice 2021- “Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song” Is A Love Story Between Art & Artist: Film Review

Leonard Cohen’s timeless tune, “Hallelujah” is one that warily weighs the importance of the divine spirit with devilish affairs. Part of the reason why the song has been so timeless is that it functions as a bridge between gospel music and traditional pop ballads. In Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song, directors Daniel GellerContinue reading “Venice 2021- “Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song” Is A Love Story Between Art & Artist: Film Review”

“Together” is a Reminder (and Future Warning) About Life in Quarantine: Film Review

While COVID-19 was supposed to be on the downswing when Bleeker Street decided to release Together, the Delta variant has questioned if we ever will truly return to normal. In that regard, director Stephen Daldry’s Together feels more like a portal into the life we’re about to return to than a reminder of what we’veContinue reading ““Together” is a Reminder (and Future Warning) About Life in Quarantine: Film Review”

Mike Cuenca’s “Like a Dirty French Novel”: Film Review

The narrator at the beginning of Like a Dirty French Novel says that the stories told throughout the film are inspired by the social disorder caused by COVID-19. In that way, Cuenca’s debut is less like a European paperback and more like a funhouse mirror, distorting and exaggerating the emotional rollercoaster that is this pandemic.Continue reading “Mike Cuenca’s “Like a Dirty French Novel”: Film Review”

Nia DaCosta’s “Candyman”: Film Review

In 1992, the words “Candyman” were first heard uttered on the silver screen. The fictional folklore legend was a unique horror villain for the time, given he was basically an analogy for gentrification and the erasing of black history. The social commentary in 1992’s Candyman was as relevant and shocking as Night of The LivingContinue reading “Nia DaCosta’s “Candyman”: Film Review”

“Paw Patrol: The Movie” is a Preschooler’s Message on the Dangers of Authoritarianism: Film Review

The rise of authoritarian leaders worldwide over the last decade has become so great that now, even the world’s most popular preschool cartoon is commenting on it! On the surface, Paw Patrol: The Movie is simply a theatrical expansion of the characters and lore established in the hit TV show. Ryder and the pups relocateContinue reading ““Paw Patrol: The Movie” is a Preschooler’s Message on the Dangers of Authoritarianism: Film Review”

Leos Carax’s “Annette”: Film Review

For most musicals, the featured songs have to be catchy enough to sell you on the film, even after only hearing a tiny snippet of them from the marketing campaigns. In the process of making these legendary tunes though, the characters who sing them can be lost to time. Everyone knows the song “Have YourselfContinue reading “Leos Carax’s “Annette”: Film Review”

David Bruckner’s “The Night House”: Film Review

When someone is taken from us, we often are given varying degrees of artificial compassion and trays of mildly appetizing banquet food. They’re both mostly empty gestures made by those who are too uncomfortable in the aftermath of death’s presence. Yet even those acts can be sufficient at taking one’s mind off their feeling ofContinue reading “David Bruckner’s “The Night House”: Film Review”

Martin Campbell’s “The Protégé”: Film Review

This summer has already brought audiences two films that felt like they were unearthed from a Blockbuster graveyard (Those Who Wish Me Dead & The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard), and you know what they say about how all things come in threes… The Protégé is yet another action flick that tries to pretend it’s more sophisticatedContinue reading “Martin Campbell’s “The Protégé”: Film Review”